Adult Name Change

Adult Name Change

There are lots of reasons why someone may want to change their name in Texas. Some of the more common reasons we see are:

  1. You want to change your name after divorce or other major life event.
  2. You want to share the same name as other members of your family.
  3. You want to change your name after gender reassignment.
  4. You want to change your name for other reasons.

Regardless of the reason for adult name change, we make it easy with our 3-step process.

Our services are for adult name changes only. Changing the name of a child is more complicated. If you would like to change the name of a minor (under the age of 18 years), then contact an attorney to discuss your situation.

As a general rule, you cannot change your name to avoid criminal liability or creditors. People with certain criminal backgrounds cannot change their names legally.

Regardless of the reason for adult adoption, we make it easy with our 3-step process.


Our service is

Quick! Instantly download the completed paperwork.

Affordable! More cost-effective than hiring an attorney.

Guaranteed! We guarantee that the paperwork will be accepted for filing.

Frequently Asked Questions

Who can file an adult name change?

Any adult may file a petition requesting a change of his or her name. See Texas Family Code Sec. 45.101.

Where do I file my adult name change?

The petition for adult name change must be filed in the county of the adult’s place of residence. Refer to Texas Family Code Section 45.101.

Tip: If you are not sure if your local court handles these types of cases, call the court clerk and ask, “Are you a district or statutory county court granted jurisdiction in family law cases and name changes?”  If the clerk says, “yes”, then you can file there.  If the clerk says, “no”, then ask them to direct you to the right clerk and keep calling until you find the right one.

If I change my name, does that mean the rest of my family’s name changes too?

 No.  An adult name change will not change the names of other members of your family, including your spouse or children.  Each person will have to change his or her own name individually.

Do I need to file an adult name change if I’m getting married?

No. A certified copy of your marriage certificate serves should be sufficient.

 However, if you would like a last name that is completely different from either your maiden name or your spouse’s name, then you will probably need to file a formal name change with the court.

Do I need to file an adult name change if I’m getting divorced?

Maybe. Most Final Decrees of Divorce should have a line in them that grants a name change. If this was left out of your final decree or court order for any reason, then you will need to file a formal name change with the court.

What does a Texas adult name change require?

 

A petition to change the name of an adult must be verified and include:

(1)  the present name and place of residence of the petitioner;

(2)  the full name requested for the petitioner;

(3)  the reason the change in name is requested;

(4)  whether the petitioner has been the subject of a final felony conviction;

(5)  whether the petitioner is subject to the registration requirements of Chapter 62, Code of Criminal Procedure; and

(6)  a legible and complete set of the petitioner’s fingerprints on a fingerprint card format acceptable to the Department of Public Safety and the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

(b)  The petition must include each of the following or a reasonable explanation why the required information is not included:

(1)  the petitioner’s:

(A)  full name;

(B)  sex;

(C)  race;

(D)  date of birth;

(E)  driver’s license number for any driver’s license issued in the 10 years preceding the date of the petition;

(F)  social security number;  and

(G)  assigned FBI number, state identification number, if known, or any other reference number in a criminal history record system that identifies the petitioner;

(2)  any offense above the grade of Class C misdemeanor for which the petitioner has been charged; and

(3)  the case number and the court if a warrant was issued or a charging instrument was filed or presented for an offense listed in Subsection (b)(2).

(c)  A petitioner is not required to provide the street address of the petitioner’s place of residence or the petitioner’s reason for the requested change of name as otherwise required by Subsection (a) if the petitioner provides a copy of an authorization card certifying in accordance with Article 58.059, Code of Criminal Procedure, that the petitioner is a participant in the address confidentiality program administered by the attorney general under Subchapter B, Chapter 58, Code of Criminal Procedure.

Why don’t you offer name changes for minors or children?

Changing the name of a minor child is more complex than an adult name change. When changing the name of a minor, both parents must consent to the name change. If one of the parents cannot be located, is incarcerated, or refuses to agree, then it’s not likely that the name change will be granted.

 The court will also consider the reasons for the name change, and they must be in the best interest of the minor child. Even if both parents agree, a court can refuse the name change because it is not in the child’s best interest.

Can I change my name if I have a criminal record?

Maybe. A court may refuse to change your name if doing so would be against your interest or the public’s interest. You must provide information about your criminal background to the court for consideration.

 A court cannot change your name if you have a felony conviction unless you can show that you have been pardoned, it has been at least two years since you were discharged from prison or completed probation, or you are asking to change your name to the primary name used in your criminal history record.

 A court cannot change your name if you are a registered sex offender, unless you also notify local law enforcement that you are asking for the name change.

Do I need to file a name change to correct the spelling of my name in my birth certificate?

Maybe not. Contact the Texas Vital Statistics Unit to research your options. You may be able to complete one of their forms to correct the mistake. If not, you can use one of our packages to get a court order.

Why should I use your service when I can get the forms online for free?

You benefit from our experience.

To be clear, you don’t hire us as your law firm, and we don’t give you legal advice. Rather, you buy a do-it-yourself package from us that we have developed from our experience with name changes so that you benefit from our experience without the high price tag. That means that we save you all the time, embarrassment, and expensive mistakes that we made when we first started doing these by providing you with clear, tested instructions, forms, and resources.

 We also use technology with our service that makes it easy to fill out easy to understand questions that enable our system to fill out the forms for you. The forms are completed without you trying to figure out how to fill out the form yourself, and you get them instantly upon completion of the questionnaire.

 You get extras.

With our package, you can get extras like a name change guide because we know from experience that this is what helps clients after the name change is complete.

 You get great customer service.

We have not only the experience but also the customer service that other sites don’t offer for name changes. We understand that you want a quick, simple, and affordable option, but that you also want it done right. If you have questions about your package, you can contact us and speak with a member of our team. Our service offers the best of both worlds – affordability and the convenience of do-it-yourself combined with the guidance and expertise of a law firm.

 You get a satisfaction guarantee.

We guarantee that our forms will be complete and have everything you need to file in the State of Texas. If for any reason your filing is rejected, contact us to see if we can help you correct the error and resubmit it. If we can’t help you, then we will refund your money.

 

Alexandra Geczi PLLC, Dallas, Texas. Visit www.FamilyLawDFW.com to learn more and to contact us.

This website and self-help services and forms are not a substitute for legal advice. Free forms and instructions may be available on your state or local court website. Communications from you are not covered by the attorney-client or work product privileges. Any purchase from this website is subject to and governed by our Terms and Conditions. All attorney services are provided independently through Alexandra Geczi PLLC and are subject to a separate attorney-client agreement.
Terms and Conditions